[Coladam] anyone see this post?

Geoff Oltmans geoff at oltmansfamily.org
Tue Dec 8 01:49:27 CET 2009


No, I think they are different. This is a ROM emulator. They apparently used to use them at work before the advent of in circuit emulators (takes the place of the processor instead of the ROM).



On Dec 7, 2009, at 3:52 PM, Joe Blenkle wrote:

> Anyone else see this post on the Coleco programming forum on Yahoo? Does this device kind of sound like that thing that was up for auction awhile back on eBay that sold for a gagillion dollars?
> 
> Joe B.
> 
> 
> From: Martin <martinmueller2003 at yahoo.com>
> Subject: [colecoprogramming] Re: Cartridges
> To: colecoprogramming at yahoogroups.com
> Date: Monday, December 7, 2009, 10:51 AM
> 
> Hi Guys
> 
> I am pretty new to this group. A bit of background on me: I worked in the colecovison hardware and software development labs as a software designer. Unfortunately I got rid of much of my old Coleco equipment. However, before I left we had developed a ram based emulator that plugged into a game console via a cable soldered to a game card (with some driver chips. This cable was then soldered to a special card we developed that plugged into a PCI slot on an IBM PC. The PC card had 256KB of RAM mapped into the cable using bank switching (at least 4 games used bank switching). The ram was loaded via a program running on the PC. This meant the only limit to the number of games you can hold is the size of your hard drive (pretty small by today's standards).
> 
> At any rate, the rig allowed us to distribute the games to testers without burning them to EPROMS. Has anyone in this group tried anything similar?
> 
> FYI, things got even easier when we developed the Adam computer. There we simply transferred the games to the spacious floppy disk (yes we had a 3 1/2 inch disk working) and played the games from secondary memory.
> 
> It is nice to see the game is still being used. FYI, if you are handy enough to be soldering chips, then you should be able to use one of the ttl/cmos level shifting driver chips. That would solve the voltage problem and give you some isolation. It does add a few more parts, but the system should be very reliable using today's high density flash parts. 
> 
> Martin
> 
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